HCC’s SafeTCPIP is a complete TCP/IPv4 network stack developed to the ISO 26262 Automotive Safety Integrity Level (ASIL) B standard. This makes it suitable for integration with any safety system complete with full process that is mappable to other standards such as IEC 61508 and ISO 62304.

Automotive software developers may require a TCP/IP stack to be integrated into a safety product to guarantee the quality of the networking, or to allow it to be used in a safety environment for a supporting, non-safety-critical role such as diagnostics. The de facto network standard for connected cars and in-vehicle safety systems is TCP/IP, but commercially available products are rarely developed to meet safety standards, are only partially certified, or are tightly integrated to a single vendor’s development system and RTOS.

SafeTCPIP fills a critical market need by giving automotive OEMs and suppliers an off-the-shelf solution that has been independently designed to satisfy TCP/IP networking requirements. The reusability of the TCP/IP stack contributes to long-term stability and reduces development costs.

Critical to the success of this approach, SafeTCPIP is developed to full ISO 26262 Section 6 processes for integration with automotive systems that require a high safety-integrity level and is supported by an independent software lifecycle for maintenance. The exact verified product that is integrated can be maintained and modified to safety standards independent of any other project that integrates SafeTCPIP. Because it is developed as a SEooC, the Element can be integrated with the company’s other safety development lifecycle.

Stack Components

The initial release of SafeTCP/IP includes the following modules each built to this standard:

  • IPv4
  • TCP
  • UDP
  • Socket
  • ARP
  • Ethernet Interface
  • ICMP
  • IGMP
  • DHCP

SafeTCPIP can be integrated with almost any RTOS and includes a test suite to validate the RTOS resources required by the stack.

Space Separation

For safety systems that require space separation, HCC can provide a solution. As full space separation involves a performance trade-off, the degree of space separation can be defined when the stack is ordered.